How to Crochet A Flat Circle – Free Crochet Pattern & Video Tutorial

Many crochet projects start off by crocheting a flat circle: hats, circular blankets, baskets and amigurumi toys to name a few. Today I’m going to teach you how to crochet a flat circle by sharing a free pattern for a basic flat circle in different stitches. as well as some troubleshooting tips for fixing a circle that doesn’t want to lay flat.

I’ve included a youtube video showing each of the free patterns below to create a perfect circle.

Understanding how to crochet a flat circle with basic crochet stitches can help you to improvise when crocheting and troubleshooting issues that you may encounter when crocheting. Understanding the basic formula for crocheting a flat circle is a must-have skill for crocheters.

These instructions can work with any yarn weight and hook combination however, your personal tension and gauge factor into whether your crocheted circle is perfectly flat or not.

Make sure that you check out my helpful tips for troubleshooting any issues that you may have come up.

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small purple, medium teal and large grey crochet circles in a flat lay with text that says How to Crochet A Flat Circle Tutorial and Free Crochet Pattern plus video tutorial

How to Crochet a Flat Circle – Basic Technique

To crochet a flat circle, the basic principles are the same for each of the basic stitches: you’ll start off by working a round of stitches into a magic ring / adjustable ring or into some chains. Then you’ll have to increase the number of stitches that you work evenly every round by the same number of increase stitches.

If you’ve ever made an amigurumi project before and noticed that each round the number of stitches increases by 6, this is why.

The type of stitch that you begin with will determine how many stitches that you will need to start your circle with as well as how many stitches you will need to increase in each round.


Today I’m using the spiral method to show you how to make a flat crochet circle but this same method can be used when working in joined rounds. When you get to the end of each round, you would join your last stitch to your first stitch (or turning chain) with a slip stitch. Then you’d create a turning chain appropriate for the stitch you’re using (1 for SC, 2 for HDC and 3 for DC, etc.).

If you’re following a pattern, make sure to check to see if the chain stitches count as an actual stitch (most common in a double crochet circle) or not so you can double-check your stitch count.

My personal preference is to use the spiral pattern over the joined rounds because it doesn’t have a seam like the joined round circle does. the spiral pattern over the joined rounds because it doesn’t have a seam like the joined round circle does.

How Many Stitches Do You Start With to Crochet a Flat Circle?

As I mentioned above, the stitch that you start with in the first round of your circle will determine how many stitches you start with each round. The number of stitches you’ll start with using a single crochet stitch versus a double crochet stitch differe.

Below, are the number of stitches that I generally start with for the type of stitch I begin with.

  • Single Crochet Stitches: 6 stitches
  • Half Double Crochet Stitches: 8 stitches
  • Double Crochet Stitches: 12 stitches

group of colorful flat crochet circles on a white background

How to Crochet a Flat Circle – Free Basic Pattern

Materials

Abbreviations

Pattern Notes

  • Place a stitch marker in the first stitch of the round, moving it up each subsequent round to mark the beginning of each round.

  • This pattern is worked in continuous rounds (which means do you NOT join with a slip stitch at the end of the round) so there is no seam. If you’d prefer to work in joined rounds, slip stitch the last stitch to. the first stitch at the end of each round and chain up the number of chains needed. for the stitch you are using ( 1 for SC, 2 for HDC, 3 for DC).

  • Instructions given in the brackets are to be repeated the number of time indicated next to the brackets. When the pattern reads (SC 2, SCINC) x 6 it means single crochet in the first 2 stitches and single crochet increase in the next stitch and to repeat that pattern a total of 6 times around. If you prefer a longer form: you would *SC in the first ST, SC in the next ST, SCINC in the next ST and then repeat those instructions from the * 5 more times.

  • The number in the () at the end of instructions indicates the number of stitches / total stitch count you should have at the completion of the round.

  • The size of your circle will greatly depend on your yarn/hook combination and your personal tension/gauge.


For this tutorial, I’m using WeCrochet Brava Worsted Weight Yarn & a Furls Crochet hook.

How to Crochet A Flat Circle Video Tutorial

How to Crochet a Flat Circle With Single Crochet

Round 1: Make a MC and SC 6 into the MC. (6)

Round 2: (SCINC) x 6. (12)

Round 3: (SC, SCINC) x 6. (18)

Round 4: (SC 2, SCINC) x 6. (24)

Round 5: (SC 3, SCINC) x 6. (30)

Round 6: (SC 4, SCINC) x 6. (36)

Round 7: (SC 5, SCINC) x 6. (42)

Round 8: (SC 6, SCINC) x 6. (48)

Round 9: (SC 7 ,SCINC) x 6. (54)

To continue to crochet a larger circle, you would continue to increase each round by 6 in the same manner as shown in the single crochet flat circle pattern above. You could continue to work this pattern, increasing by 6 each round until your piece is your desired size.

My favourite way to finish off and to get a perfect flat circle with single crochet is to use the invisible join, aka the invisible finish (see my invisible join tutorial here). This technique is an easy way to get cleaner color changes and open edges in amigurumi projects as well using the tail end of your yarn.

How to Crochet a Flat Circle With Half Double Crochet

flat crochet circle on a white background

Round 1: Make a MC and HDC 8 into the MC. (8)

Round 2: (HDCINC) x 8. (16)

Round 3: (HDC, HDCINC) x 8. (24)

Round 4: (HDC 2, HDCINC) x 8. (32)

Round 5: (HDC 3, HDCINC) x 8. (40)

Round 6: (HDC 4, HDCINC) x 8. (48)

Round 7: (HDC 5, HDCINC) x 8. (56)

Round 8: (HDC 6, HDCINC) x 8. (64)

Round 9: (HDC 7, HDCINC) x 8. (72)

To continue to crochet your circle, you would continue to increase each round by 8 in the same manner as shown in the half double crochet flat circle pattern above. You could continue to work this pattern, increasing by 8 each round until your piece is your desired size.

How to Crochet a Flat Circle With Double Crochet

grey flat crochet circle on a white background white a crochet hook

Round 1: Make a MC. Chain 3 (counts as the first DC), DC 11 into the MC. (12)

Round 2: (DCINC) x 12. (24)

Round 3: (DC, DCINC) x 12. (36)

Round 4: (DC 2, DCINC) x 12. (48)

Round 5: (DC 3, DCINC) x 12. (60)

Round 6: (DC 4, DCINC) x 12. (72)

Round 7: (DC 5, DCINC) x 12. (84)

Round 8: (DC 6, DCINC) x 12. (96)

Round 9: (DC 7, DCINC) x 12. (108)

To continue to crochet your circle, you would continue to increase each round by 12 in the same manner as shown in the double crochet flat circle pattern above.

You could continue to work this pattern, increasing by 12 each round until your piece is your desired size.

Reasons Why Your Crochet Circles Don’t Lay Flat ( And How to Fix Them)

Circles That Are Curling:

  • You have stopped increasing or are not increasing enough.
    • Solution: Frog the piece (or at least the rounds where you start to curl) and make sure you’re increasing evenly. Double check that you have the right number of stitches by counting your stitches at the end of your round.

  • Your hook size may be too small for the yarn you’re using.
    • Solution: Frog the piece and try again with a larger hook size.

  • You’re crocheting too tightly or your tension is wonky.
    • Solution: Try blocking the piece to see if it helps it to lay flat.

    • Solution: Frog the piece and try again with a looser tension or adjust your hook size.

Circles That Are Ruffling/Rippling:

  • This usually happens because there are too many stitches in a round and the stitches are bunching together.
    • Solution: If the ruffling is minor (as can sometimes happen when the project gets very large), try blocking your project.
    • Solution: Frog the piece and try again with fewer stitches.

  • Using stitches of varying heights:
    • Solution: If some rounds of your circle are done in double crochet and others are done in single crochet, you’ll need to adjust the number of stitches you increase in each round to accomodate that.
  • When ruffling/rippling is minor, it could be due do tension.
    • Solution: Try blocking the piece to see if it helps it to lay flat.

I hope that you enjoyed this tutorial. I’d love to see projects that you make using one of my crochet patterns!  Share your projects with me on social media by tagging me @theloopylamb or using #theloopylamb in your posts.

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2 thoughts on “How to Crochet A Flat Circle – Free Crochet Pattern & Video Tutorial”

  1. So, how do you propose that we finish once the circle is as big as we want it?

    Reply
    • That depends on which stitch you’re using, what you intend to use your circle for and whether you’re doing the piece in a continuous spiral or turned rounds. For pieces that are used as just a flat circle and made in a continuous spiral (ie a rug or coaster) here’s what I’d do: for single crochet you can join the first and last stitch with a slip stitch or use the invisible join (I have a tutorial for this HERE). For hdc, I’d personally SC in the first stitch of the round and sl st in the 2nd st. For DC I’d do hdc in the first st of the round, sc in the next and the. Sl st in the next to have a gradual decrease instead of the huge step from the first step to the last dc of the round.
      I hope this helps. Let me know if you have any other questions ☺️

      Reply

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