How to Crochet a Cone Tutorial and Free Crochet Pattern

Learn how to crochet a cone with this easy tutorial. In this blog post, you’ll learn how to crochet a cone and the tools you need to learn what kind of cone to pick for your next project. In this cone free pattern, I’m going to show you multiple ways to crochet a cone shape and how the placement of your increase stitches affects the shape of your cone.

Knowing how to crochet a cone shape is a versatile skill to have, particularly if you like to crochet amigurumi toys. Cones are basic shapes that are used to create horns, tusks, ice cream cones, a witch hat or gnome hat, a christmas tree, carrots and so much more! So whether you want to make a tiny key chain or a taller tree crochet cone tree, cones can be useful in all shapes and sizes

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When using this technique for amigurumi, you’ll need to ensure you have a tight, even tension. If you aren’t following an amigurumi pattern with a recommended hook size and yarn, I recommend starting with an E / 3.5 mm crochet hook and worsted weight yarn.

In amigurumi crochet, single crochet stitches help to give shapes structure. You can use this technique with another stitch, like double crochet to create an elf or santa hat, it just won’t have the same structure as piece made with single crochet.

For this tutorial, I’m going to show you how to crochet a cone in a continuous spiral but the same technique can be utilized to create a cone in turned and / or joined rounds (joining at the end of the round with a slip stitch / sl st). These cones are worked from the tip of the cone and up however, you can work in the opposite direction as well. You would work from the opening of the cone (the last round) and substitute single crochet decreases (sc dec) for increase stitches.

6 colourful crochet cones lined up in two rows of three on a white background with text underneath that says How to Crochet a Cone Tutorial and Free Pattern

The below cones were all created with 6 single crochet stitches worked into a magic ring. But how you distribute your increases changes how quickly the cone flairs out.

Skill Level:

  • Easy

Materials :

Abbreviations (U.S. Terminology):

  • CH = Chain

  • MC = Magic Circle / Magic Ring / Magic Loop

  • SC = Single Crochet

  • SC INC = Single Crochet Increase / 2 SC Stitches in the Same Stitch

  • ST(s) = Stitch(es)

Notes:

  • Gauge isn’t vital to creating a cone but ensure that you choose an appropriately sized crochet hook for your yarn. If you’re planning on stuffing your cone with polyfill/stuffing make sure that your stitches are tight enough to prevent the stuffing from showing through. If your holes are too big, try going down a hook size until they are small enough to hide the stuffing.

  • Take a moment to count the stitches in the previous round / the round you just did before moving onto the next round to ensure that you have the right number of stitches. If you have fewer stitches than expected, look back to see if you can find the missing stitch(es). If you can’t find it, pull the round out and try again to ensure you have the right number of stitches before moving onto the next round.

Video Tutorials You May Find Helpful Before Starting This Tutorial:

5 colourful crocheted cones in a circular placement with a furls crochet hook laying in the center

How to Crochet A Cone Adding Increases Every Round

These first three cones all have an increase stitch (two single crochet stitches worked in the same stitch) happening every round of the project. How quickly the cone flares out depends on how many increase stitches that you add each round. This kind of cone requires a little more counting and thinking to make sure you always have the right amount of stitches and to ensure your cone increases evenly.

How to Crochet a Cone Working One Increase Per Round Cone:

This is the most narrow of all the cones. Without the increase, in each round, you would crochet a tube. Working one increase per round creates a slow, subtle flare. I prefer not to stack my increases so that they are less visible so you’ll see that they aren’t placed on top of each other in the pattern.

purple crochet cone on a white background made with 1 increase every round

Round 1: Magic a MC and SC 6 into the MC. Pull the ring tight. (6)

Note: Place a stitch marker in the first stitch you did to mark the first stitch of the round. We will move this up each consecutive round we work.

Round 2: SC 5, SCINC. (7)

Round 3: SC 3, SCINC, SC 3. (8)

Round 4: SCINC, SC 7. (9)

Round 5: SC 4, SCINC, SC 4. (10)

Round 6: SC 9, SCINC. (11)

Round 7: SC 5, SCINC, SC 5. (12)

Round 8: SCINC, SC 11. (13)

Round 9: SC 6, SCINC, SC 6. (14)

Round 10: SC 13, SCINC. (15)

To continue with your cone, you would continue to increase 1 stitch per round until it reaches your desired size. If you’re stuffing your cone, make sure that you are stuffing as you go to ensure the the tip of your cone is stuffed properly and your piece is evenly stuffed.

Two Increases Per Round Cone:

This cone starts to flare out at a faster rate than the previous cone. Again, I’ve off set the increase stitches slightly to make the cone more even as well as to make the increases slightly less visible.

pink crochet cone on a white background made with 2 increases every round

Round 1: Magic a MC and SC 6 into the MC. Pull the ring tight. (6)

Note: Place a stitch marker in the first stitch you did to mark the first stitch of the round. We will move this up each consecutive round we work.

Round 2: (SCINC, SC 2) x 2. (8)

Round 3: (SC 3, SCINC) x 2. (10)

Round 4: SC 2, SCINC, SC 4, SCINC, SC 2. (12)

Round 5: (SC 5, SCINC) x 2. (14)

Round 6: SC 3, SCINC, SC 6, SCINC, SC 3. (16)

Round 7: (SC 7, SCINC) x 2. (18)

Round 8: SC 4, SCINC, SC 8, SCINC, SC 4. (20)

Round 9: (SC 9, SCINC) x 2. (22)

Round 8: SC 5, SCINC, SC 10, SCINC, SC 5. (24)

To continue with your cone, you would continue to increase 2 stitches per round until it reaches your desired size. As mentioned in the previous cone, make sure that if you are stuffing your cone with polyfill stuffing to stuff your cone as you work.

Three Increases Per Round Cone:

This cone starts to flare out at an even faster rate than the previous two cones. Again, I’ve off set the increase stitches slightly to make the cone more even as well as to make the increases slightly less visible.

dark teal crochet cone on a white background made with 3 increases every round

Round 1: Magic a MC and SC 6 into the MC. Pull the ring tight. (6)

Note: Place a stitch marker in the first stitch you did to mark the first stitch of the round. We will move this up each consecutive round we work.

Round 2: (SC, SCINC) x 3. (9)

Round 3: SC, (SCINC, SC 2) x 2, SCINC, SC. (12)

Round 4: (SCINC, SC 3) x 3. (15)

Round 5: SC 2, (SCINC, SC 4) x 2, SCINC, SC 2. (18)

Round 6: (SC 5, SCINC) x 3. (21)

Round 7: SC 3, (SCINC, SC 6) x 2, SCINC, SC 3. (24)

Round 8: (SCINC, SC 7) x 3. (27)

Round 9: SC 4, (SCINC, SC 8) x 2, SCINC, SC 4. (30)

Round 10: (SC 9, SCINC) x 3. (33)

To continue with your cone, you would continue to increase 3 stitches per round until it reaches your desired size.

Four Increases Per Round Cone and Beyond:

You could go beyond 3 increases per round and do 4 increases or even 5 increases per round but honestly, not many designers/makers utilize these because of how tedious it can be to keep their distribution even throughout the cone. The more increases you add per round, the quicker your cone will flare out and the more rounded looking it will become.

three colourful crochet cones lined up in a row, showing samples of cones made with this how to crochet a cone tutorial
all three cones with increasing happening every round

How to Crochet A Cone With Increases Happening Every Second Round

This is my preferred way to crochet a cone because you are increasing your stitches every other round instead of every round. The rounds after you have done an increase are done in just single crochet stitches, giving you a bit of a mental break.

Below I’ll show you the differences as well as how to make three different cones by increasing every other round.

Two Increases Per Round, Every OTHER Round Cone:

This cone starts to flare out at a slow rate and works well for making crochet carrots. Again, I’ve off set the increase stitches slightly to make the cone more even as well as to make the increases slightly less visible.

grey crochet cone on a white background made with 2 increases every other round

Round 1: Magic a MC and SC 6 into the MC. Pull the ring tight. (6)

Note: Place a stitch marker in the first stitch you did to mark the first stitch of the round. We will move this up each consecutive round we work.

Round 2: (SCINC, SC 2) x 2. (8)

Round 3: SC around. (8)

Round 4: (SC 3, SCINC) x 2. (10)

Round 5: SC around. (10)

Round 6: (SCINC, SC 4) x 2. (12)

Round 7: SC around (12)

Round 8:(SC 5, SCINC) x 2. (14)

Round 9: SC around (14)

Round 10: (SCINC, SC 6) x 2. (16)

Round 11: SC around (16)

To continue with your cone, you would continue to increase 2 stitches per round, every other round until it reaches your desired size. As mentioned in the previous cone, make sure that if you are stuffing your cone with polyfill stuffing to stuff your cone as you work.

Three Increases Per Round, Every OTHER Round Cone:

This cone starts to flare out at an even faster rate than the previous cone. Again, I’ve offset the increase stitches slightly to make the cone more even as well as to make the increases slightly less visible.

yellow crochet cone on a white background made with 3 increases every other round

Round 1: Magic a MC and SC 6 into the MC. Pull the ring tight. (6)

Note: Place a stitch marker in the first stitch you did to mark the first stitch of the round. We will move this up each consecutive round we work.

Round 2: (SC, SCINC) x 3. (9)

Round 3: SC around. (6)

Round 4: SC, (SCINC, SC 2) x 2, SCINC, SC. (12)

Round 5: SC around. (12)

Round 6: (SCINC, SC 3) x 3. (15)

Round 7: SC around. (15)

Round 8: SC 2, (SCINC, SC 4) x 2, SCINC, SC 2. (18)

round 9: SC around. (18)

Round 10: (SC 5, SCINC) x 3. (21)

Round 11: SC around. (21)

To continue with your cone, you would continue to increase 3 stitches per round every other round until it reaches your desired size.

Six Increases Per Round, Every OTHER Round Cone:

teal crochet cone on a white background made with 6 increases every other round

This cone starts to flare out at the fastest rate of all the cones we have discussed. Again, increases are offset in this cone as we’ve done previously so increases are not worked into previous increases. This is the blue cone in the photo showing the cone scale above.

Round 1: Magic a MC and SC 6 into the MC. Pull the ring tight. (6)

Note: Place a stitch marker in the first stitch you did to mark the first stitch of the round. We will move this up each consecutive round we work.

Round 2: (SCINC) x 6. (12)

Round 3: SC around. (12)

Round 4: (SC, SCINC) x 6. (18)

Round 5: SC around. (18)

Round 6: SC, SCINC, (SC 2, SCINC) x 5, SC. (24)

Round 7: SC around. (24)

Round 8: (SC 3, SCINC) x 6. (30)

round 9: SC around. (30)

Round 10: SC 2, SCINC, (SC 4, SCINC) x 5, SC 2. (36)

Round 11: SC around. (36)

To continue with your cone, you would continue to increase 6 stitches per round every other round until it reaches your desired size.

three colourful crochet cones lined up in a row, showing samples of cones made with this how to crochet a cone tutorial
all three cones with increasing happening every other round

Here I have lined up all the cones that we have covered in this tutorial so that you can see what they look like side-by-side so that you can see the differences between them all. This can help you to choose what kind of cone you’d like to choose as a starting point for your next project.

colourful crochet cones lined up in two rows of three, showing samples of cones made with this crochet tutorial

Ways to Customize and Play With Cones to Make Your Own Patterns

  • Change color every few rounds to create a striped cone (avoid jags in your color by using the invisible finish/join technique).

  • Make cones of various sizes and make pom poms of different sizes and colors for kids to make their own ice cream cone play set. Alternatively, use the cones and crochet a topper to make a fully crocheted ice cream cone.

  • Create a large cone shape and place it over a foam cone to make a tall cone tree.

  • Make an orange cone, add safety eyes and give a crochet carrot some attitude like I did with my Carter the Carrot free crochet pattern.

  • Make Gnome hats like I did in my Gnome Christmas Tree Ornament Free Pattern & Video Tutorial.

  • Make a Narwhal tusk with a white cone like I did in my Ned the Narwal & Wanda the Whale Free pattern.

I hope that you enjoyed this how to crochet a cone tutorial! Want to learn something else? Check out my how to crochet a flat circle tutorial (includes a free crochet pattern) or my Ultimate Guide to Softening Acrylic Yarn. Happy crocheting!

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